Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Extra Extra Read All About It!

Copyright Center of Southwest Studies,Fort Lewis College

In researching Moonshine Murder, I ran across some fantastic articles in the Durango Evening Herald. For the next couple posts, I would like to share the best quotes and photography. Some are quite comical.

This morning, John Contoleon was arraigned before Judge Draper on the charge of a violation of the liquor laws. He was defended by Attorney Barry Sullivan while the case was prosecuted by Deputy District Attorney Ja. Noland, Jr., assisted by D.A. W. Bruce
Jacobson. The officers are said to have found about a pint and a half of liquor secreted in the water reservoir of the toilet. Contoleon denied the violation. After the evidence had been
introduced Judge Draper announced that he would take the case
under advisement and would render his decision tomorrow morning.
Durango Evening Herald
February 18, 1925

Attorney Barry Sullivan scored a victory in Judge Draper’s court this morning when his client John Contoleon was acquitted of the charge of having violated the liquor laws.
Durango Evening Herald
February 19, 1925

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

The Women's Temperance Movement and Prohibition

Nineteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution: Section 1. The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

The temperance movement, beginning in 1893, was greatly influenced by some women who believed strongly in Prohibition. One such woman was Carrie Nation. She was married to an alcoholic and left him. Believing she was given a vision, she destroyed many saloons with an ax. The prohibition law was passed by Congress in December 1917. Women didn’t have the right to vote for two more years, though many claimed women greatly influenced the prohibition law. Slowly, the nation realized the injustice against women in denying them the right to vote. The Nineteenth Amendment was passed in 1920--too late to vote for the Eighteenth Amendment, but early enough to vote for the next President, Hubert Hoover, who was for Prohibition.

The “Ladies of Logan” sing hymns in front of a bar in support of the temperance movement.
Copyright State Historical Society of Wisconsin